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By Ira Liebowitz

Originality is always a favorable characteristic of any creative work. With this thought in mind, the dramatics crew, as its initial Saturday evening presentation of the 1962 season, treated the camp to a talent show entirely different from any other we've seen in many years. Given the title "On the Seas," the show was guided by a story, an idea which provided all lookers-on with a new and fun-filled type of entertainment.

The story is typical and light. Sally Edwards is about to leave home for a vacation on the high seas. Before her departure, though, her fiance Jerry (David Lapidus) gives her a light warning about all the wolves who'll "give you the eye" (Bye Bye Baby). Nevertheless, the free-wheeling, suave playboy (Ira Liebowitz) manages to capture her her with his smooth pitch. Inviting her to the "Cabaret Night" held on board that evening (singing "Birds and the Bees"), he rapidly places doubts into her mind as to whether or not she really loves Jerry.

The cabaret night is an entertaining one. Emcee Howie Kerner, after telling of the girls who go "Gliding Through My Memory," introduces a group of talented youngsters: rock and roll guitarist Steve Blum and singer Ronnie Vogel, as well as the lonely seamen scene "Standing on the Poopdeck" watching all the girls go by.
After the fun has ended, Steve (Ira) again tries to sway Barbara (Sally) with "Old Devil Moon," and then asks her whether or not she truly wants to settle down with Jerry. Again uncertain, she thinks she is convinced that she no longer loves Jerry, although more so after Steve's rendition of "Moon River."

The following day, however, a close friend of Barbara's (Natalie Grossman) again changes the confused girl's mind, but this time permanently by informing her of her own experiences with that two-timing plaster saint. Now enlightened, Barbara returns home to Jerry and tells him that from now on its "Together."

The plot was fun, the music and performances entertaining, and the talent precisely that. All in all, the evening was a light, rather enjoyable one.